Ryan Shorthouse quoted in The Telegraph: The green lobby is coming for your gas stove

Bright Blue’s director, Ryan Shorthouse, has been quoted in The Telegraph on the topic of ‘greening’ the gas supply in the UK to reduce emissions.

Ryan is quoted as saying:

“We have to progressively raise the amount of green gas or get people quitting away from gas to electricity”

“If we’re going to meet the net-zero requirement, we have to considerably reduce the amount of natural gas that we use”

Read the full article here.

telegraph.jpg

Patrick Hall featured in Business Green: "Hall sees a spending push to help decarbonise the UK's draughty housing stock as a potential top green policy area to emerge tomorrow"

Bright Blue Researcher, Patrick Hall, has been featured in Business Green, stating that he believes the Government’s spending review is unlikely to be anchored around environment and climate policy, but that a spending push to help decarbonise the UK's draughty housing stock could be a potential top green policy area to emerge in the review.

Read the full article here.

branding_logo.png

William Nicolle mentioned in Cities Today: Should cities pay residents to spot idling offenders?

Bright Blue’s most recent report, Emission impossible? Air pollution, national accountability and the transport sector, has been featured in an article on Cities Today.

Bright Blue’s Researcher and co-author of the report, William Nicolle, was quoted as saying that councils don’t enforce anti-idling regulations:

“This is not just the fault of the councils– the current law is very difficult to enforce, due to needing the presence of a traffic officer and the fact that a warning must be issued before applying any fine”

Read the article here, and full report here.

Bright Blue Researcher William Nicolle featured on HuffPost: "Brexit is an opportunity to improve the quality of our air"

Bright Blue’s researcher William Nicolle and co-author of our recent report Emission Impossible? has been featured on HuffPost.

In the article, he argues that Brexit it an opportunity to improve the quality of our air.

Read the article here, and Emission Impossible here.

express and star.jpg

Petrol prices should rise to fight air pollution, says Bright Blue

Bright Blue’s recent report, entitled Emission impossible? Air pollution, national governance and the transport sector, was released yesterday and featured in Kent Online.

Their coverage included Howard Cox from Fair Fuel UK, a pressure group that campaigns against increases in fuel taxes, but no representative from Bright Blue. However, Howard engaged in a debate with our Reseacher and co-author of the report, William Nicolle, on talk Radio in the same day.

Listen to their coverage here, and Emission Impossible here.

express and star.jpg

Bright Blue Researcher William Nicolle quoted in Business Green

Bright Blue’s recent report, entitled Emission impossible? Air pollution, national governance and the transport sector, was released yesterday and featured in Business Green.

Business Green’s article focused on several policy recommendations, particularly raising fuel duty and scrapping Value Added Tax (VAT) for ultra-low emission vehicles.

Co-author of the report and researcher at Bright Blue William Nicolle was quoted as saying:

“Stronger evidence has emerged in recent years about the detrimental impact of air pollution to human health, the economy and the environment," he said.

"Consequently, there is growing public and political pressure for tougher action to reduce levels of air pollution in the UK. The UK government needs new, ambitious legal limits, legal responsibilities, and policies on air pollution. This country should aspire to be a global leader on yet another environmental issue, and strive to become the country with the cleanest air in urban areas in the developed world."

Read Business Green’s article here, and Emission Impossible here.

business green.png

Bright Blue argue for raising taxes on diesel to cut air pollution

Bright Blue’s recent report, entitled Emission impossible? Air pollution, national governance and the transport sector, was released yesterday and featured in The Guardian.

The Guardians’ article focused on several policy recommendations, particularly raising fuel duty and scrapping Value Added Tax (VAT) for ultra-low emission vehicles.

Our director Ryan was quoted as saying:

“The evidence of the scale and impact of air pollution is growing and alarming. As the UK leaves the EU, there is a need and an opportunity to improve legislation, policies and accountability around air quality. Despite the rhetoric from the government, enough is not being done to tackle NO2.”

Read The Guardians’ article here, and Emission Impossible here.

guardian.png

Bright Blue's proposed citizen-based reporting system for idling within charging clean air zones featured in The Times

Bright Blue’s recent report, entitled Emission impossible? Air pollution, national governance and the transport sector, was released yesterday and featured in The Times.

The Times’ article focused on one particular policy recommendation, around making it mandatory for local authorities with a charging Clean Air Zones to be required to have a citizen-based reporting system to aid in the enforcement of anti-idling legislation.

Read The Times’ article here, and Emission Impossible here.

New Committee on Climate Change report criticises the UK's climate change action

The Committee on Climate Change (CCC) has today released their annual progress report, Progress in Preparing for Climate Change - 2019 Progress Report to Parliament.

The report addresses the UK’s current progress on reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, the policies generating this reduction, and the UK’s adaption to climate change.

The CCC suggests that the UK is not on track for its recent net zero GHG emissions target by 2050. Indeed, more damningly, the CCC argue the UK is not on track to meet its past, less ambitious, target of an 80% reduction in GHGs by the same date.

Read the CCC’s full report here, and coverage from the BBC here.

Net zero greenhouse gas emissions target law begins passage through Parliament

Natg.png

Yesterday, the draft law to create a net zero emissions target for the UK by 2050 was put to Parliament by Chris Skidmore MP, who is currently a joint Minister of State for the Department of Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy and the Department of Education.

The draft law proposes updating the existing greenhouse gas emissions reduction target set by the Climate Change Act 2008 of an 80% reduction by 2050 to 100% by the same year.

Such action follows Theresa May’s announcement of the net zero target earlier this month before her departure from office. This follows the Committee on Climate Change’s influential Net Zero report, arguing for the adoption of a legal net zero emissions goal by 2050 at the very latest - as Bright Blue has previously campaigned for.

Read more about the proposed law currently making its way through parliament here, the CCC’s Net Zero report here, and Bright Blue’s response to the CCC’s report here.

National grid and the energy sector react to Labour's plans to renationalise the energy network, saying it will hamper moves towards green energy

Natg.png

There have been widespread reactions today to the Labour Party’s plans for the energy sector if elected.

The reactions focus on two aspects of Labour’s announcements: to renationalise the energy network, and install one million solar panels on low-income households.

Here is an excerpt from National Grid’s reaction:

“Proposals for state ownership of the energy networks would only serve to delay the huge amount of progress and investment that is already helping to make this country a leader in the move to green energy”

Read more on the story as covered by Carbon Brief here.

Bright Blue submits letter to The Times: 'Green-edged Tories'

Bright Blue’s Director, Ryan Shorthouse, submitted a letter to The Times this week. In it, Ryan draws on past Bright Blue research to point out there is a political mandate for the Government to adopt the Committee on Climate Change’s recent advice to the Government for a legal, net zero emissions target to be reached 2050 at the ver latest, and that market economies are the path to deeper decarbonisation.

Ryan’s submission to The Times is below:

“Sir, There are vocal sceptics of man-made climate change within the Conservative movement (“Climate divides Tories just as much as Brexit”, Rachel Sylvester, May 14), but research by Bright Blue indicates that a clear majority of Conservative Party voters, of all ages, believe that humans are causing climate change and are concerned about its impact.

Our research also shows that climate change is the No 1 issue that adults aged 28 and under want politicians to say and do more about. As Rachel Sylvester rightly suggests, reducing the UK’s greenhouse gas emissions (to net-zero by 2050 at the very latest, as recently recommended by the independent Committee for Climate Change) is an environmental and political necessity for any centre-right government. But the centre-right also needs to argue loudly that it is in fact market economies that have best supported — and will, in the future, best support — deeper decarbonisation.”

Read the letter published in The Times here, and Bright Blue’s polling work on voters’ attitudes to climate change and the UK’s climate leadership here.